"Life begins at the end of your comfort zone."

~Neale Donald Walsch~

Thursday, 19 February 2015

Stuck Getting Started

This week I have noticed that my students have had some trouble just starting.


When there are a number of students in the room that struggle to start it can be quite difficult to race around and speak to everyone. After all there is only 1 of you. However you may be able to try a few strategies.
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What do you already know?
Often students don't think they know anything on a topic when in fact they really do. A set of general questions might help the grey matter get moving and be a prompt to have a place to start.

What don't you know?
Similarly sometimes when students are overwhlmed they just say, " I don't know anything." This always needs to be followed by a series of questions. Exactly what is it that you don't know? How can we go about finding out about it? Who else might know something about it? Supporting students using higher thinking questions can also assist in prompting them to begin to think about their topic.

Give an example
More often than not I always give an example. Students need a place to start or at the very least some idea of what is expected. The difficulty sometimes is getting the less able students to not copy word for word the example that is given but to ask them to use the structure and their own words to respond to the topic or instruction.


Pair up with someone
Pair the student up with a more able student who does now how to start. It's hard to get around to everyone so use your able students to encourage and assist others. However make sure that even though they might be helping someone they don't feel as though you are neglecting to speak to them about their work because they have been busy helping others.

Provide some prompting questions
Asking good questions will always lead to further thinking of ideas and strategies. Even though who, how, what, why, when and where are a good place to start the 5 whys can be a way of digging a little deeper. If you have a problem you are trying to work out then ask at least 5 why questions to get the student thinking.

Provide a very structured outline
Providing a rubric they can complete is a great way to start thinking. There are many ways to record your initial ideas and thoughts however with many different learning styles in one class it can be tricky. Some learners like to use mind maps and others like to make lists. It's important not to constantly force learning tools on students that they don't like to use. Having options for initial thinking gives the learner choice and gives them confidence in their own learning style and ability.

These are a few strategies I used this week to help students begin to research a topic for an oral presentation.

Here is the template I gave to my students as they began to think about their topic and where they could start their research.

Please let me know if you use some other strategies.

Until next week,
Kathryn